Three new rodents from lava beds of southern New Mexico
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Three new rodents from lava beds of southern New Mexico by Seth Bertram Benson

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Published by University of California Press in Berkeley, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Rodents -- New Mexico

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesThree new rodents from southern New Mexico
Statementby Seth B. Benson.
SeriesUniversity of California publications in zoology -- v. 38, no. 5
ContributionsUniversity of California, Berkeley. Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL1 .C15 vol.38, no.5
The Physical Object
PaginationP. [335]-344, [2] leaves of plates :
Number of Pages344
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19090184M

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Three New Rodents from Lava Beds of Southern New Mexico, , University of California Publications in Zoology, 38 (5): pages and 2 plates. [S. B. Benson] on . Three New Rodents from Lava Beds of Southern New Mexico [S. Benson, 2 b & w Plates] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : S. Benson.   New Mexico Lava Beds Along I The first two photos show the McCarty’s Lava flow beside Rt. (historic Rt. 66) about 4 miles east-southeast of I exit 89 between Grants and McCarty’s, New Mexico. S. B. Benson, Three new rodents from lava beds of southern New Mexico. Berkeley, CA: University of California Pres, Berkeley, CA: University of California Pres, C. Adams, Three ranches west: a true story of John S. Chisum, the cowman who opened the west for the cattle trade.

Rumors had spread that the Modocs were in a part of the lava beds located on the south shore of Tule Lake, a strongpoint as yet unnamed but which would soon be known as Captain Jack's Stronghold. It was also believed, correctly, that the Indians had made themselves self-sufficient by acquiring a herd of cattle as a source of food. Three New Rodents from Lava Beds of Southern New Mexico. University of California Press, , University of California Publications in Zoology, 38 (5): pages and 2 plates. Printed wraps, previous owners name, other minor signs of use and age, very good condition. $ As skeleton-happy New Mexicans know, honoring departed souls is not some eerie voyage into the macabre—in fact, it’s an annual cause for celebration. From the somber to the festive, El Día de los Muertos—the Day of the Dead—is an occasion for descendants to . Gardner’s book doesn’t explore those questions, which deserve our era’s critical eye. His fast pace and comprehensive research, though, carry readers into a brief and memorable period of history, with pointy-toed boots firmly planted in New Mexico’s cowboy story. HIKING TO HISTORY A Guide to Off-Road New Mexico Historic Sites (UNM Press.

New Mexico by J. K. Frey (, Museum of Texas Tech University Occasional Papers Number ). It comprises all native and non-native species of mammals that occur, or recently occurred, in New Mexico. Scientific and common names generally follow Mammal Species of the World by D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder (, John Hopkins University Press). McLeod, Kenneth. Typescript of an interview taped at Lava Beds NM, November McLeod was a long-time resident of the Klamath Falls area. His grandparents were forced to flee their ranch at the beginning of the Modoc War. Were Mr. Mcleod still alive he would undoubtedly enjoy the controversy arising from some of his opinions concerning the war. tails, ring-tails, and mule deer. On the lava beds of southern New Mexico, it occurs with rock squirrels, gray-footed chip- munks, rock pocket mice, deer mice, spotted skunks, coyotes, and bobcats. In Mexico, A. interpres is an important food source for predators, including humans, because it . The white-throated woodrat, Neotoma albigula albigula Hartley, and the southern plains woodrat, Neotoma micropus canescens J.A. Allen, have sympatric ranges in New Mexico and Texas (Hall and Kelson, ). However, the literature on the two species indicates general habitat segregation, both in New Mexico and in Texas.